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ESTATE OF COREY HILL, by Personal Representative Rudolph Hill,
Plaintiff-Appellee,
v.
CHRISTOPHER MIRACLE,
Defendant-Appellant.
   No. 16-1818
Appeal from the United States District Court
for the Eastern District of Michigan at Detroit.
No. 2:15-cv-10079—Gershwin A. Drain, District Judge.
Argued: January 25, 2017
Decided and Filed: April 4, 2017
Before: GILMAN, GRIFFIN, and STRANCH, Circuit Judges.


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OPINION
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RONALD LEE GILMAN, Circuit Judge. This case involves the question of whether a deputy sheriff used excessive force in tasing a combative and disoriented diabetic suffering a hypoglycemic episode in order for the attending paramedics to stabilize his life-threatening condition. The district court denied the deputy’s motion for qualified and governmental immunity. For the reasons set forth below, we REVERSE the judgment of the district court, and REMAND the case with instructions to dismiss the complaint with prejudice.



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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
Plaintiff-Appellee,
v.
OSCAR HARRIS,
Defendant-Appellant.
   No. 16-2239
Appeal from the United States District Court
for the Eastern District of Michigan at Detroit.
No. 2:10-cr-20461-1—Bernard A. Friedman, District Judge.
Decided and Filed: April 4, 2017
Before: COLE, Chief Judge; SUTTON and KETHLEDGE, Circuit Judges.


_________________________
OPINION
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SUTTON, Circuit Judge. A jury convicted Oscar Harris of being a felon in possession of a firearm, and the district court sentenced him to 300 months’ imprisonment under the Armed Career Criminal Act’s residual clause. After the Supreme Court invalidated the residual clause, Harris received a new sentence of 115 months—the top of a range set in part by the district court’s determination that Harris’s two prior convictions for Michigan felonious assault were crimes of violence under the Guidelines. Harris challenged that determination, and appeals it here, on the ground that Michigan felonious assault does not categorically involve the “use, attempted use, or threatened use of physical force,” as the elements clause of the Guidelines requires. U.S.S.G. § 4B1.2(a). But Michigan’s felonious assault statute obliges a jury to find at least attempted or threatened offensive touching and use of a dangerous weapon. Because those two elements together add up to violent force, and thus to a crime of violence, we affirm.