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MISO TRANSMISSION OWNERS,
Petitioner,

MIDCONTINENT INDEPENDENT SYSTEM OPERATOR, INC.,
Intervenor,
v.
FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION,
Respondent,

DUKE ENERGY OHIO, INC. and DUKE ENERGY KENTUCKY, INC.; FIRSTENERGY SERVICE COMPANY,
Intervenors.
   No. 16-3791
On Petition for Review of Orders of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.
Nos. ER12-715-001; ER12-715-003; ER12-715-004.
Decided and Filed: June 21, 2017
Before: KEITH, BATCHELDER, and SUTTON, Circuit Judges.


_________________________
OPINION
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SUTTON, Circuit Judge. Midcontinent Independent System Operator, Inc., is a nonprofit association of utilities that manages electrical transmission facilities on behalf of its members. Under its well-earned acronym, MISO approves infrastructure projects and allocates the costs among its member utilities in order to maintain the electrical grid and increase its capacity. Duke Energy and American Transmission Systems own utilities in Ohio and Kentucky, and they withdrew from MISO in 2011. At stake is whether the utilities must pay for projects that MISO approved after they announced their departure but before they left. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ruled in favor of the utilities. Because the Commission correctly interpreted the terms of MISO’s Tariff, we deny the petition for review of its order.



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EDWARD MONROE, FABIAN MOORE, and TIMOTHY WILLIAMS, on behalf of themselves and all others similarly situated,
Plaintiffs-Appellees,
v.
FTS USA, LLC and UNITEK USA, LLC,
Defendants-Appellants.
   No. 14-6063
On Remand from the United States Supreme Court.
No. 2:08-cv-02100—John Thomas Fowlkes, Jr., District Judge.
Decided and Filed: June 21, 2017
Before: BOGGS, SUTTON, and STRANCH, Circuit Judges.


_________________________
OPINION
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STRANCH, Circuit Judge. Edward Monroe, Fabian Moore, and Timothy Williams brought this Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) claim, on behalf of themselves and others similarly situated, against their employers, FTS USA, LLC and its parent company, UniTek USA, LLC. FTS is a cable-television business for which the plaintiffs work or worked as cable technicians. The district court certified the case as an FLSA collective action, allowing 293 other technicians (collectively, FTS Technicians) to opt in. FTS Technicians allege that FTS implemented a company-wide time-shaving policy that required its employees to systematically underreport their overtime hours. A jury returned verdicts in favor of the class, which the district court upheld before calculating and awarding damages. On appeal, we affirmed the district court’s certification of the case as a collective action and its finding that sufficient evidence supported the jury’s verdicts, but reversed the district court’s calculation of damages.