CLICK HERE FOR FULL TEXT
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
Plaintiff-Appellee,
v.
MATTHEW J. KING,
Defendant-Appellant.
   No. 16-4039
Appeal from the United States District Court
for the Northern District of Ohio at Cleveland.
No. 1:15-cr-00381-1—Donald C. Nugent, District Judge.
Decided and Filed: August 4, 2017
Before: SILER, SUTTON, and WHITE, Circuit Judges.


_________________________
OPINION
_________________________

SUTTON, Circuit Judge. A sting operation blends fiction with non-fiction. The undercover officer feigns an offer to commit a crime and the individual accepts the offer, converting an offer to commit a crime based on untruths into a crime based on a true desire to violate the law. Sometimes, as it happens, the resulting crime blends non-fiction with fiction. In this instance, Matthew King, a lawyer, agreed to commit a real crime (by laundering the supposed proceeds of non-existent drug sales) and offered to do so on the basis of a moneylaundering technique observed on a fictional T.V. show (by imitating Saul Goodman, a lawyer character on Breaking Bad, who set up a sham corporation to launder drug proceeds).

This did not end well. A jury convicted King of two counts of money laundering and one count of attempted money laundering. King appeals his convictions on two grounds: (1) that the introduction of recorded conversations between him and the informant violated his Sixth Amendment right to confront the witnesses against him, and (2) that the district court improperly allowed the prosecution to ask him about his prior arrest for cocaine possession. We affirm.