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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
Plaintiff-Appellee,
v.
GEREMY ATKINS,
Defendant-Appellant.
   No. 16-5531
Appeal from the United States District Court
for the Western District of Tennessee at Memphis.
No. 2:15-cr-20019—John Thomas Fowlkes, Jr., District Judge.
Argued: December 1, 2016
Decided and Filed: December 13, 2016
Before: MOORE and CLAY, Circuit Judges; HOOD, District Judge.


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OPINION
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CLAY, Circuit Judge. Defendant Geremy Atkins appeals from the judgment of conviction and sentence entered by the district court on April 21, 2016 after a jury found Defendant guilty of one count of being a felon in possession of a firearm in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 922(g)(1). On appeal, Defendant argues that his conviction is tainted because the government violated the Equal Protection Clause and Batson v. Kentucky, 476 U.S. 79 (1986) by striking a black venireperson for racially motivated reasons during jury selection for Defendant’s trial. We have jurisdiction to entertain this appeal pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 1291. For the reasons set forth below, we REVERSE the district court’s denial of Defendant’s Batson challenge, VACATE Defendant’s conviction and sentence, and REMAND for a new trial.



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LEE JASON KIBLER, dba DJ Logic,
Plaintiff-Appellant,
v.
ROBERT BRYSON HALL, II; VISIONARY MUSIC GROUP, INC.; WILLIAM MORRIS ENDEAVOR ENTERTAINMENT, LLC; THREE OH ONE PRODUCTIONS, LLC; UMG RECORDINGS, INC., dba Def Jam Recordings,
Defendants-Appellees.
   No. 15-2516
Appeal from the United States District Court
for the Eastern District of Michigan at Detroit.
No. 2:14-cv-10017—Arthur J. Tarnow, District Judge.
Argued: September 27, 2016
Decided and Filed: December 13, 2016
Before:COLE, Chief Judge; DAUGHTREY and MOORE, Circuit Judges.


_________________________
OPINION
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COLE, Chief Judge. Lee Jason Kibler, a disc jockey, brought federal trademark infringement, related state law, and federal trademark dilution claims against Robert Bryson Hall, II, a rapper, and professional entities supporting Hall’s work. The district court granted summary judgment to defendants on all claims. Kibler has appealed that judgment, requiring us to answer two questions. First, has Kibler provided evidence sufficient to find that relevant consumers are likely to confuse the sources of his and Hall’s products? Second, has Kibler provided evidence sufficient to find that Hall has diluted Kibler’s mark? We conclude no and thus affirm the grant of summary judgment.